Home » Assessment of attitudes and norms about HIV testing among college students in India using Theory of Reasoned Action. by Medha R Sasane
Assessment of attitudes and norms about HIV testing among college students in India using Theory of Reasoned Action. Medha R Sasane

Assessment of attitudes and norms about HIV testing among college students in India using Theory of Reasoned Action.

Medha R Sasane

Published
ISBN : 9780549637547
NOOKstudy eTextbook
267 pages
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 About the Book 

Background. HIV among young Indian adults is rising. Studies have shown that HIV testing and counseling has reduced risky behaviors among young adults. Therefore, there is an urgent need to understand young adults perceptions about HIVMoreBackground. HIV among young Indian adults is rising. Studies have shown that HIV testing and counseling has reduced risky behaviors among young adults. Therefore, there is an urgent need to understand young adults perceptions about HIV testing.-Research Question. This study used the TRA framework to evaluate young Indian adults attitudes and norms about HIV testing. Differences in attitude and testing intentions were evaluated by gender and by whether a student had become sexually active or not.-Methods. Data were collected in classrooms from 3000 students from 15 colleges in Mumbai and Pune. The model for HIV testing intentions was tested using linear regression analysis methods. Perceived vulnerability, partner related beliefs, testing consequences, testing access, and parent, peer, partner norms were the independent variables.-Results. About 2.4% of students were tested for HIV and 8% expressed intentions to get tested. More males had multiple partners (60% vs. 35%) with a little less than half (46%) reporting they used condoms compared to .41% of females. The regression model fit the SA students (r 2 = 0.22) better than virgin students (r2 = 0.16). The best fit was for not currently sexually active (NCSA) men (r2 = 0.39). Vulnerability and perceived consequences were the two key predictors in all groups, especially among currently sexually active women (CSA) (B = -0.35, -0.41). Partner related beliefs were significant only among CSA men whereas peer norms were significant among CSA, NCSA men and virgin students. Access to testing was an additional predictor among virgin students.-Conclusions. The salience of perceived vulnerability and consequences related to stigma suggests they would be especially important to address in public campaigns to improve HIV testing intentions among young Indian adults. TRA proved to be a useful framework for conceptualizating the relationship between young adults attitudes and their HIV testing intentions.