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Authors Revised Ed. Alice Edward Bulwer-Lytton

Authors Revised Ed. Alice

Edward Bulwer-Lytton

Published in 1838, Alice, or The Mysteries picks up the story of the disenchanted poet-gone-politician-gone-recluse Ernest Maltravers, his early love Alice Darvil and his underhanded antagonist Lumley Ferrers. Whereas, after Florence Lascelle...Read full review

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ISBN : 9780217179584
Paperback
262 pages
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883. Excerpt: ... think of Lord Vargrave and this fatalMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883. Excerpt: ... think of Lord Vargrave and this fatal engagement- and every day I feel it more and more. To leave my dear, dear mother--the dear cottage--oh, I never can. I used to like him when I was a child- now I shudder at his name. Why is this? He is kind--he condescends to seek to please. It was the wish of my poor father--for father he really was to me- and yet--oh, that he had left me poor and free At this part of Evelyns meditation the unusual sound of wheels was heard on the gravel- she started up--wiped the tears from her eyes--and hurried down to welcome the expected guests. CHAPTER V. Tell me, Sophy, my dear, what do you think of our new visitors?--Vicar of Wakefield. jffiRS. MERTON and her daughter were already in the jh middle drawing-room, seated on either side of Mrs. Leslie. The former a woman of quiet and pleasing exterior- her face still handsome, and if not intelligent, at least expressive of sober good-nature and habitual content. The latter a fine, dark-eyed girl, of decided countenance, and what is termed a showy style of beauty--tall, self-possessed, and dressed plainly indeed, but after the approved fashion. The rich bonnet of the large shape then worn- the Chantilly veil- the gay French Cachemire- the full sleeves, at that time the unnatural rage- the expensive, yet unassuming robe de soie- the perfect chaussure- the air of society- the easy manner- the tranquil but scrutinising gaze--all startled, discomposed, and half-frightened Evelyn. Miss Merton herself, if more at her ease, was equally surprised by the beauty and unconscious grace of the young fairy before her, and rose to greet her with a well-bred cordiality, which at once made a conquest of Evelyns heart. Mrs. Merton kissed her cheek, and smiled kindly on her, but said little. It...