Home » The Commerce of Louisiana During the French Regime, 1699-1763 (71, No. 1) by Nancy Maria Miller Surrey
The Commerce of Louisiana During the French Regime, 1699-1763 (71, No. 1) Nancy Maria Miller Surrey

The Commerce of Louisiana During the French Regime, 1699-1763 (71, No. 1)

Nancy Maria Miller Surrey

Published January 11th 2012
ISBN : 9781458869388
Paperback
246 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1916. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XXI Trade W1th Mex1co When La SalleMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1916. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XXI Trade W1th Mex1co When La Salle made his attempt to plant a settlement on the Gulf coast, trade relations between France and Spain were broken off, but it was the belief of the French that the weakness and corruption among Spanish colonial officials would make it easy to enter into trade with Mexico in spite of the legal restrictions. To this end it was proposed to keep at St. Esprit Bay (Muddy Lake), seventy leagues from Mexico, an abundance of merchandise better in quality than could be procured at Vera Cruz.1 The death of La Salle, however, delayed the settlement of Louisiana until some of the restrictions on the trade had been removed, but as they were continued against the English the result was a double gain for the French.2 Iberville was also interested in the proposed trade. During his first visit to the Gulf of Mexico he found at Pensacola two Spanish vessels, from Vera Cruz and Havana, respectively. This chance encounter was destined to produce important results. As early as 1703, one of the royal traversiers had made three trips from Louisiana to Vera Cruz in search of food supplies for the new colony, after which time boats from the former made frequent voyages to the latter on similar errands. On these 1 Margry, vol. lii, pp. 568-569. Charlevoix, New France, vol. v, p. 128- Hist. Coll. of La., pt. 3, pp. 40-41. Margry, vol. iv, p. 502- Hist. Coll. of La. and Fla., vol. i, p. 20. 388 388 ships, however, the governor at Vera Cruz would allow only limited quantities of supplies to be taken, poor in quality and high in price.1 That these voyages to and from Vera Cruz were not wholly for the purpose of securing supplies of food is evident from the fact that, in 1710, a complaint was made to the home government that the royal vess...